Transalpina Cycling

Cycling towards the highest point on the Transalpina, the Urdele Pass (2.145 m). Copyright Martin Cycling Adventures

Cycling towards the highest point on the Transalpina, the Urdele Pass (2.145 m). Copyright Martin Cycling Adventures

 
 

highlights

The Transalpina Highway is a paved mountain road located in the Parâng Mountains group, in the Southern Carpathians of Romania. It's one of the highest roads of the Carpathian Mountains and the highest road in Romania. The road was built under the rule of King Carol II and rebuilt during World War II by German troops. It is called "The King's Road" by the locals because King Carol II and his family opened the road back in the 1930's. Also a story has it that Nicolae Ceauşescu had the Transfăgărăşan Road built during the communist regime just to surpass the Transalpina.

The road has its highest point at the Urdele Pass, where the elevation is 2,145 m above sea level. Given the high altitude, the road is closed during the cold months of the year. Works began in 2007 in order to transform this spectacular road into a modern highway (148 km), allowing a rapid transit between Oltenia and Transylvania.

Cycling the Transalpina Road

The elevation profile of the Transalpina and it's length (+60 km when compared to the Transfagarasan) make this road a more demanding one for cycling. At the end of the day, you'll feel your legs a lot heavier than after cycling the Transfagarasan. When you start riding from the S, you have 30 km to get to the top. After a couple of km of descending, you start a brutal climb that sucks the rest of the energy out of your legs. Wait, there's more. After a nice and peaceful descent, you still have 6 km of climbing and 10 km of flat roads, until you get to the final, long descent. Yeah, it's quite demanding!

If you are looking for a cycling tour in Romania check out our Transfagarasan Epic Cycling Tour that includes both the Transfagarasan and the Transalpina Highways.

The TRANSALPINA Road on STRAVA

Mangart CLIMB climb profile via climbbybike.com

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